During my time in Chile, I was inspired by the book The Startup of You by LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha. The book basically argues that to succeed in a rapidly changing world and fiercely competitive global economy we all need to develop entrepreneurial traits and treat our careers like a startup. I think this is excellent advice as the new career trajectory seems to include a mix of salaried employment and project-based contract work.

Last week I saw a graphic which was similar to this one and simply indicated how much time a digital CEO should be dedicated to content consumption vs. creation. I guess my version is a bit more extreme than the one that I saw but the message is clear: as a digital entrepreneur you have to make sure that most of your time consists of creation instead of consumption. And I must admit that this is harder than it might sound. Every day I come across tons of really great content which I want to properly save to come back to it later. For example, I subscribe to lots of newsletters and receive tons of free pdf downloads which I love because I always think that I get delivered value which I can use for my own blog postings, videos or workshops. But the problem is that this information has no end. I could scroll through the internet for decades and would still find content that seems awesome and really necessary.
Get out a pen and paper and add these numbers up – the amount of time you spend getting primped for work each day plus the number of minutes — or, in some places, hours — you spend on your daily round-trip commute. Now multiply that number by five and you’ll see just how many hours you’ll gain if you can manage a side hustle that you can do in your pajamas. Over the weeks, months, and years, it could add up to thousands of hours!
Internet marketing is THE portable business in the millennial era. Internet marketing gives the tech pro or SEO blogger the freedom to work anywhere in the world. Internet marketing has become the lifeblood of many businesses from startups, to small publishers and professional advisors (like mine), to multinationals, marketing dollars are moving towards the web.
In April 2008 the State of New York inserted an item in the state budget asserting sales tax jurisdiction over Amazon.com sales to residents of New York, based on the existence of affiliate links from New York–based websites to Amazon.[45] The state asserts that even one such affiliate constitutes Amazon having a business presence in the state, and is sufficient to allow New York to tax all Amazon sales to state residents. Amazon challenged the amendment and lost at the trial level in January 2009. The case is currently making its way through the New York appeals courts.
In the 2000s, with more and more Internet users and the birth of iPhone, customers started searching products and making decisions about their needs online first, instead of consulting a salesperson, which created a new problem for the marketing department of a company. In addition, a survey in 2000 in the United Kingdom found that most retailers had not registered their own domain address.[12] These problems made marketers find the digital ways for market development.
In February 2000, Amazon announced that it had been granted a patent[18] on components of an affiliate program. The patent application was submitted in June 1997, which predates most affiliate programs, but not PC Flowers & Gifts.com (October 1994), AutoWeb.com (October 1995), Kbkids.com/BrainPlay.com (January 1996), EPage (April 1996), and several others.[13]
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